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Industry News (133)

Findings highlight potential benefits of parent-based strategies to curb childhood obesity.

A study by King's College London and St George's University of London has found that babies introduced to solid foods early, slept longer, woke less frequently at night and suffered fewer serious sleep problems, than those exclusively breastfed for around the first six months of life. The research is published today in JAMA Pediatrics.

Eating a Mediterranean-type diet could reduce bone loss in people with osteoporosis – according to new research from the University of East Anglia.

SACN has published its report on 'Feeding in the first year of life', providing recommendations on infant feeding from birth up to 12 months of age.

Research dispels fear that gastric bypass surgery leads to long-term muscle issues
Newly-published research on surgically-induced weight loss provides important evidence supporting the long-term safety and viability of bariatric surgery.

Findings support view that evidence is "insufficient" for taking vitamin D supplements during pregnancy.

A new study by researchers from The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (TILDA) at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland, has shown for the first time that a substantial number of adults over 50 are at risk of deficiency in vitamin B12 and folate (the natural vitamin linked to the dietary supplement, folic acid).

New research warns that the normalisation of 'plus-size' body shapes may be leading to an increasing number of people underestimating their weight – undermining efforts to tackle England's ever-growing obesity problem.

New research from the British Nutrition Foundation (BNF) reveals that 60% of 11 to 16-year olds say they buy food, such as chips or fried chicken, from takeaways at lunchtime or after school at least once a week, along with almost a third (31%) saying they have an energy drink at least once a week.

There is a link between higher serum vitamin D levels and lower plasma cholesterol levels in primary school children, new research from the University of Eastern Finland shows. Children whose serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels exceeded 80 nmol/l had lower plasma total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels than children whose serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were below 50 nmol/l, which is often regarded as a threshold value for vitamin D sufficiency. 25-hydroxyvitamin D is the major circulating form of vitamin D. The findings were reported in one of the leading journals of endocrinology, the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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